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20121224
20121224
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york city area, we have not seen the price relief other places in the nation have. >> no, we haven't. there was a little bit of almost an embolism that occurred when the pipeline shut down and we didn't get the normal flow of products from the gulf coast after sandy, a little bit from isaac too, so our prices here in the northeast are actually 10 or 15 cents above the lows for the year. and i suspect that may continue for a little while. on the west coast, we had a nice down trend, but today of all days, when a lot of people aren't even showing up, kind of like the giants yesterday, we're seeing prices actually move higher in california in a couple refinery issues. so that's going to be the hot market again in 2013. you've got an adversarial relationship between refiners and regulators and that doesn't add up to anything good. dagen: there's something very strange going on in terms of the wholesale market for gasoline and export of gasoline. can you explain that? >> yeah, one of the reasons the east coast has higher prices is -- and there's plenty of gulf coast product is the pipel
for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castlehing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finde, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. david: joining us one of my favorite people, scott shellidy from the cme. we just heard a lot of talk about how we are heading towards the fiscal cliff, whether they want to or not, i don't care, but the fact is if we do, does that mean we will be hitting another recession? >> well, it's funny how we talk about the fiscal cliff and we ignore the fact that our economy is no better off than we really were say even two years ago. for the fed to come in with 6 1/2% unemployment rate in their last meeting. it would take four to five years of 200,000 jobs per month. we are going to be nowhere near that. these politicians are using that at some sort
. it is disastrous when applied to economies that were already in trouble. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. you can stay in and share something... or you can get out there and actually share something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> good morning again, everyone. the fiscal cliff headline looms, but a solution seems to be far off. >> mario monti is saying that he's willing to lead italy, but only if a party backs his economic agenda for the country. >>> sylvia berlusconi tells cnbc he needs to return to the premiership to keep the lead from being turned over to the hands of the left. >> let's talk more about thi
san francisco to seattle. it will be white for tomorrow in wichita, oklahoma city, little rock and spokane. let me give you a picture about how rare this event is. this area of low pressure, it's deep and it's to the south and it's very strong. rare tornadoes. we are going to see them tomorrow. louisiana, mississippi, alabama, georgia. but the last time we had tornadoes on christmas was 2006 when we had six. the last time we had 12 was 1969, and we could see 12. not out of the question. rare snow in oklahoma city. we expect 5 to 8 inches. of the last 120 years alina we've had snow on six occasions, and that was at aleast an inch. >> wow. thank you so much. we'll check back with you later. thanks for watching cnn newsroom. newsroom international with suzanne malveaux starts right now. >>> i'm suzanne malveaux. this is the christmas eve edition of "cnn newsroom." for a lot of you today is last minute shopping or preparing christmas dinner or taking time with your families. while you're getting busy or ready for the celebrations, we'll keep you updated and, of course, the holiday
's real the governors, mayors and city states who are going to say, hey, this is going to increase our cost of borrowing. we're barely coming out of recession. you can't do this to us. >> is there a municipality right now that you know is planning on an issue later in 2013 saying this is going to screw us up in a real way? >> i don't know of any specifically, but they're basically all saying it. new york city comes to market multiple times a year. >> all the old bonds will be type. is that right? >> i'm going to make the stand and say that they will. but in the last -- >> then they become more dear, won't it seems to me. >> yeah. but what had happened is that last week and the week before, all of a sudden there was this thought because it had been thrown about that it wouldn't be retroactive. on top of that -- >> why wouldn't that cause him to go up? >> because that means that the tax, the cap on deductions would be retroactive to all bonds. >> it wouldn't be retroactive. >> no. what happened two weeks ago was that had been on the table. >> that it would be retroactive? exactly. >> how
so it is okay to run the power line through the state parks to get them to the city's whereas before this he couldn't even look at a state park was the idea of running power lines through it. without i'm going to turn this over to alex that will step us through the fallacies and the rise of the entire scientific left and we have time for q&a afterwards because i'm going to reach behind alex and popped him with a book if it runs too late. over to you and thanks for doing this. >> thanks for that kind introduction. so, i -- our book is "science left behind" and it's about the feel-good fallacies of their diet and the antiscientist left and as he said my name is alex and i got my ph.d. in microbiology from washington, and more importantly now the editor of nuclear science.com. so, just a little bit about my background entirely microbiology. in fact that's me. a friend of mine had become an ob/gyn so i look like a geek in that picture so i put there. that's me working in the chamber which you may have come across at one point. uigur left with extremely slowly bacteria. i went to the univ
slowly but surely has been fixing mgm's past mistakes including the massive citi center project in vegas that drove the company to the brink of chapter 11. this is a turn that's been years in making but now businesses are starting to come back. you haven't missed anything so this is the moment. let me explain. not long ago it was a real sick customer. took on a ton the debt when las vegas was fabulous place to do business. when the vegas market got annihilate during the great recession, mgm was crushed. think of it like this. i'm looking for analogies all the time. mgm was on its deathbed. company was on life support. gaming revenues tumbled from 2007 through 2009. the patient, it was slipping. then mgm got a pacemaker in the form of a new ceo when a one-time wall street gaming analyst took over in december of 2008 right at the height of the recession. vegas business stabilized in 2010 and 2011. the president said he didn't like trips there or something. the doctors are making improvements with mgm with rebound in chinese economy, mgm's business is getting a much needed hip replacement.
said, at the big board, the ballet from monte carlo. performing until january 6th in new york city. and over at the nasdaq, a group that does a lot of good work at this time of the year, the salvation army. >> some like it hot. >> interesting. >> the birth cage. bird cage. >> looking where we are opening, no surprise to the down side here. initially out of the gate, one of their biggest losers is microsoft, down by more than a percent. we were talking about whether or not there will be any upside to pc sales. a lot of the data points indicated by "the new york times" saying no. saying pc sales are lower than expected. you've got microsoft down by about 1%. one of the leaders for the year, you mentioned bank of america, the best performing stock on the dow. a double this year if you're lucky enough to get in on bank of america and stick with that trade. across the board financials seeing a little bit of weakness in today's session. >> keep an eye on facebook. obviously the news a little thin this morning. the sunday "times" of london reporting the company has various methods of tax
been used to mounting their attacks in the relative safety of cities which supported them and now awful a sudden they will be operating in truly hostile environments where they do not have the hearts and minds of the people themselves. the latest reports out of syria, though, show no progress on the diplomatic front. so far the one peace enjoy who has been able to meet with president bashar al-assad has walked away with every one of the meetings, including won't day saying we are at the same point we were before a civil war going on, and bashar al-assad saying he's not leaving and will continue to fight even if that means killing thousands of more of his own people. >> reporter: it seems to be so difficult was bashar al-assad continues to blame all of this on insurgents or terrorists if you will. >> reporter: i'm sorry, say again. we're having a problem with the signal. >> reporter: i apologize for that. the problem really lies in bashar al-assad's stand. he continues to blame awful his attacks on his own country coming from terrorism. >> reporter: well, he may have a point at some leve
cities and on our coasts and, you know, brought me right back to square one in terms of piquing my curiosity about how all these systems fit together. not just the internet, but power and aviation and all these large, incredibly complicated things that we depend on so much. >> host: "tubes" is the name of the book, "a journey to the center of the internet," and andrew blum is the author. this is "the communicators" on c-span. >> with a month left in 2012, many publications are putting together their year-end lists of notable books. booktv will feature several of these lists focusing on nonfiction selections. these nonfiction titles were included in the los angeles public library's best of 2012. salman rushdie recounts his years in hiding following a fatwa issued in 1989 for mr. rushdie's authorship of the novel, "the satanic verses." in "roger williams and the creation of the american soul: church, state and the birth of liberty," john barry recounts the life of the theologian and his thoughts on the division of religion and politics. former secretary of state madeleine albright re
this somewhat. he said you have to put your man in his times. you have to have the detail of city life and country life and what were the roads like, what were the airplanes like. were they pressurized. all of the details have to be there so the character can move through his world and the reader understands and has a feel for it. host: how much reading -- i don't know if you can quantify it -- how much reading did you do? and where did you do it? guest: i had a nice library in the house we bought with a fair place and view of the blue ridge mountains and i had five desks set up in a u with all the material manchester used to cut and paste into his tablets, i had the books, plus speeches and memoirs that were not available when bill was writing. off to the side i a chair, in the dining room a couch and i would take two or three books and notepad and if for instance it is the week before the invasion of russia, mid june of 1941, i've got all the diaries piled up next to one chair, another of all the recollections, speeches churchill may have made, telegrams to roosevelt, warnings to sta
inspired me most is probably clay falker. he started "new york" magazine. he recognized the city was changing and there was this new middle-class audience that did not have their own publication. he created the magazine. it was different from anything we have seen before. it was so different it sort of took your breath away. it was deeply impressive to me. he got wonderful writers. he was all for subjective takes on things. he loved being provocative. he largely created the new york city we now know, certainly the point of view. it inspired me because i have always looked up to people who sea change taking place and look at that as an opportunity instead of a threat. a couple of years before he died, i went to see him. he died about five years ago. he was at berkeley and at the time in his late 70's. he was running the graduates' magazine program at uc. he had serious cancer. it was very hard to understand him. he was still so excited about the student projects. he spent the entire morning taking me through these magazines his graduate students had created. he was an optimist and
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12